Application Notes

Extreme Customization, Well-Maintained Tooling, and Accuracy

An OEM small-batch manufacturing customer came to Nippon Pulse because their current supplier was producing motors that had a very high failure rate for their application. The supplier’s motors had worked fine for previous generations of their system, but the new generation required an accuracy from the motor that 50 percent of the delivered motors could not meet. The motor was spec’d to have sufficient resolution for the application, but was unable to deliver the accuracy. This customer contacted us and requested a sample to evaluate, which – when tested – was well within their resolution and accuracy requirements.

Linear Shaft Motors in Parallel Applications

Nippon Pulse's Linear Shaft Motor has been successfully used in parallel motor applications. Parallel applications are ones in which there are two or more Linear Shaft Motors in a parallel arrangement. The advantage that the Nippon Pulse LSMs have over other systems is the capability to run all parallel motors with only one amplifier and one encoder.

Linear Shaft Motor Sizing
<p>  One of the most straightforward tasks in the design of a linear motion system is to specify a motor and drive combination that can provide the force, speed and acceleration that is required by the mechanical design.</p>

One of the most straightforward tasks in the design of a linear motion system is to specify a motor and drive combination that can provide the force, speed and acceleration that is required by the mechanical design.

Linear Stepper Motors for Accurate Positioning Control
<p>  Nippon Pulse’s linear stepper motor offers you a cost-effective solution where accurate positioning and high force generation are required in a small package. We offer our linear stepper motor with both 25mm and 35mm diameters for use in a variety of applications, including liquid dispensing, valve control, data storage, and XY microtiter table control.</p>

Nippon Pulse’s linear stepper motor offers you a cost-effective solution where accurate positioning and high force generation are required in a small package. We offer our linear stepper motor with both 25mm and 35mm diameters for use in a variety of applications, including liquid dispensing, valve control, data storage, and XY microtiter table control.

Stepper Motors with 10mm and 20mm Diameters
<p>  Nippon Pulse has introduced two of its smallest stepper motors to date, the PFC10 and PFC20 bipolar, 2-phase tin-can steppers. The PFC10 has a 10mm diameter, and the PFC20 a 20mm diameter. Both motors are well-suited to be designed into small motor systems that require valve control and fluid dispensing, such as gaming machines and medical devices. Both motors come standard with connectors to ease system integration</p>

Nippon Pulse has introduced two of its smallest stepper motors to date, the PFC10 and PFC20 bipolar, 2-phase tin-can steppers. The PFC10 has a 10mm diameter, and the PFC20 a 20mm diameter. Both motors are well-suited to be designed into small motor systems that require valve control and fluid dispensing, such as gaming machines and medical devices. Both motors come standard with connectors to ease system integration

Linear Shaft Motor 50 Percent More Efficient than Coreless Linear Servos
<p>  Linear motors have gained a name for themselves as being a high-precision and power-efficient alternative to conventional rotary-to-linear transmission systems. How is this possible?  Well, let’s look at the Ball Screw, which also can be considered, in its own right, a high precision rotary-to-linear transmission system.  The Ball Screw is typically only 90 percent efficient<a href=

Linear motors have gained a name for themselves as being a high-precision and power-efficient alternative to conventional rotary-to-linear transmission systems. How is this possible?  Well, let’s look at the Ball Screw, which also can be considered, in its own right, a high precision rotary-to-linear transmission system.  The Ball Screw is typically only 90 percent efficient[1].  When we add the efficiency of the servo motor (range from 75 to 80 percent[2]) and losses that will be introduced by the coupling (and if using a gear box), it is possible that only 55 percent of the power we are supplying is going towards work.  When we compare the typical linear motor, where the motor is driving the load linearly, we can quickly see why the linear motor has gained a name as being more power-efficient.

An Independent Review of the Energy Efficiency of the Linear Shaft Motor
<p>  In 2010, Nippon Pulse took its Linear Shaft Motor comparison demo unit to the University of Virginia to receive an independent evaluation. Nippon Pulse wanted to verify the claim that the Linear Shaft Motor is 50 percent more energy-efficient than a comparable U-shaped linear motor.</p>

In 2010, Nippon Pulse took its Linear Shaft Motor comparison demo unit to the University of Virginia to receive an independent evaluation. Nippon Pulse wanted to verify the claim that the Linear Shaft Motor is 50 percent more energy-efficient than a comparable U-shaped linear motor.

SCR Stages Get Encoder Upgrade
<p>  All Nippon Pulse SCR nanopositioning stages are available with a upgraded encoder, the Renishaw Tonic Encoder. Any stage built after Sept. 1, 2010 – beginning with unit SN#080210-001 – will come standard with the upgraded Tonic Encoder.</p>

All Nippon Pulse SCR nanopositioning stages are available with a upgraded encoder, the Renishaw Tonic Encoder. Any stage built after Sept. 1, 2010 – beginning with unit SN#080210-001 – will come standard with the upgraded Tonic Encoder.

Linear Shaft Motors in Parallel

With the Linear Shaft Motor, you have the ability to drive two motors in parallel using only one encoder and one amplifier. All other systems require two drives, two controllers and two encoders, connected together. How is the Linear Shaft Motor able to overcome these issues?

Handling of Unused Terminals

This document explains how to handle any unused terminals on the PCL/PCD series LSIs.

Basics of Servomotor Control

This document explains the difference between a servomotor and a stepper motor when connected to a servo driver. It covers the terms used in controlling the pulse train that is supplied to the servomotor by a PCL series controller. It does not, however, explain the principles of operation or the design of the motors or drivers.

Basic Description of the PCL

This document outlines the major functions of the PCL series pulse control Large Scale Integrations (LSIs).

Basics of PCD Series Pulse Control LSIs Manual

This document explains the terms and operations of Nippon Pulse’s simplest Large Scale Integration (LSI), the PCD series. It is intended for customers who will be using our LSIs to control motors for the first time.