White Papers

Linear Shaft Motor 50 Percent More Efficient than Coreless Linear Servos
<p>  Linear motors have gained a name for themselves as being a high-precision and power-efficient alternative to conventional rotary-to-linear transmission systems. How is this possible?  Well, let’s look at the Ball Screw, which also can be considered, in its own right, a high precision rotary-to-linear transmission system.  The Ball Screw is typically only 90 percent efficient<a href=

Linear motors have gained a name for themselves as being a high-precision and power-efficient alternative to conventional rotary-to-linear transmission systems. How is this possible?  Well, let’s look at the Ball Screw, which also can be considered, in its own right, a high precision rotary-to-linear transmission system.  The Ball Screw is typically only 90 percent efficient[1].  When we add the efficiency of the servo motor (range from 75 to 80 percent[2]) and losses that will be introduced by the coupling (and if using a gear box), it is possible that only 55 percent of the power we are supplying is going towards work.  When we compare the typical linear motor, where the motor is driving the load linearly, we can quickly see why the linear motor has gained a name as being more power-efficient.

Linear Shaft Motors in Parallel

With the Linear Shaft Motor, you have the ability to drive two motors in parallel using only one encoder and one amplifier. All other systems require two drives, two controllers and two encoders, connected together. How is the Linear Shaft Motor able to overcome these issues?

Handling of Unused Terminals

This document explains how to handle any unused terminals on the PCL/PCD series LSIs.

Basics of Servomotor Control

This document explains the difference between a servomotor and a stepper motor when connected to a servo driver. It covers the terms used in controlling the pulse train that is supplied to the servomotor by a PCL series controller. It does not, however, explain the principles of operation or the design of the motors or drivers.

Basic Description of the PCL

This document outlines the major functions of the PCL series pulse control Large Scale Integrations (LSIs).

Basics of PCD Series Pulse Control LSIs Manual

This document explains the terms and operations of Nippon Pulse’s simplest Large Scale Integration (LSI), the PCD series. It is intended for customers who will be using our LSIs to control motors for the first time.